Technical Articles

The BFPA / BFPDA community is a rich source of technical expertise born of consolidated industry experience running into hundreds of years.  The following suite of articles is a small selection of the views and knowledge articulated by BFPA’s technical experts and consultants.

Should you feel that you have a potentially valuable contribution to make to this portfolio please contact either Yvonne Pearman or Sarah Gardner on 01608 647900. 

Handling the pressure – recent developments in hydraulic cylinder technology - September 2016

by Trevor Hornsby, Chairman of the British Fluid Power Association (BFPA) Technical Committee 3 (TC3) Cylinders.

Hydraulic cylinders play a critical role for motion control within a wide range of industrial applications. They are available in a wide range of force capacities, sizes and stroke lengths, and are invaluable for tasks such as lifting, pushing and pulling of plant and machinery used in a wide range of industries, such as aerospace, oil & gas, materials handling, mining, construction and rail.

Many of the basic principles behind the construction and operation of hydraulic cylinders have been established since the early years of the Industrial Revolution. And with a technology that has been so tried-and-tested it is easy to understand why many cylinders today bear a strong resemblance to those used many decades ago, or even longer. Nevertheless – as with many other types of industrial equipment – things move on.

Standardising dimensions

For example, the dimensions of parts used on today’s hydraulic cylinders have been largely standardised in order to allow more flexible and convenient interchangeability regardless of vendor or agent the part is source from. Indeed, the British Fluid Power Association (BFPA), the BSI Group (British Standards Institution) and the International Standards Organisation (ISO) have been instrumental in helping to establish a more level playing field in terms of sizes and specifications related to hydraulic cylinders. The Standard BS ISO 6020-2:2015 HFP – Mounting dimensions for cylinders, 16 MPa (160 bar) series, is a case in point.

Material advances

While the main metal parts of a hydraulic cylinder can often continue to operate efficiently with very little maintenance over many years – including the rod, glands, pistons, spherical bearings, flanges and tubes, some parts usually need replacing more frequently – the seals, for example. There are many variables to consider when determining the best time to replace cylinder seals – types of oil used, frequency of use, temperature, what the cylinder is being used for and in what type of environment etc. although originally seals were made of leather, common materials used today include various types of rubber, polyurethane, PTFE, fabric reinforced elastomers and plastics. For applications where a particularly high level of wear resistance is required, thermoplastic seals could fit the bill. Seals made of this material can deliver a particularly high level of wear resistance, chemical resistance and resilience, operational reliability and service life. For the best possible selection it is advisable to discuss the particular use of your particular cylinder usage with a seals provider that has a proven pedigree within your own industry sector. The BFPA is also on hand to provide additional guidance.

Higher levels of corrosion resistance

Traditional materials used to plate piston rods in hydraulic cylinders include nitride, chrome, chrome over nickel or other multi-layer/multi-process rod plating technologies. These coating materials may remain largely corrosion-free in many applications. However, in more challenging industrial environments keeping corrosion levels to a minimum can prove more of a challenge, and increase the total cost of ownership. The good news is that recent developments have focused on developing alternative coatings that offer considerably greater corrosion resistance – and thus less downtime and a reduction in required maintenance intervals.

Lighter weight

High pressure hydraulic products require high strength structural components. Traditionally, high strength steels have been used for typical mobile and industrial applications, while more expensive lower density alloys were used where reduced weight was critical. However, the introduction of carbon fibre composite materials has opened up new possibilities for the design of lightweight, high-strength components. These lighter-weight cylinders are suitable for a range of applications. Lightweight composite cylinders permit greater boom reach and a reduced stabilizer envelope for mobile concrete pumps. High performing composite cylinders can be ideally suited for various aerospace applications – for example to operate in wing flap test rigs. Faster acceleration, reduced energy demand and shorter cycle times are achieved by using composite hydraulic cylinders to operate an industrial robotic arm. Composite cylinders provide greater corrosion resistance and increased payload for sub-sea drilling rigs. Working offshore, weight is critical. Using lightweight, corrosion-resistant composite cylinders as assembly tools for wind turbines increase the work rate of crews, enhance safety and reduce crane loading. Reducing axle load through the use of composite materials frees up capacity elsewhere; for example, in military applications for additional armament.

RFID

Another area of development that supports the Industry 4.0 concept is that of RFID (radio frequency identification) technology that can open up new approaches to seal management. RFID chips placed onto seals can facilitate more accurate identification and traceability; substantially simplifying maintenance and replacement tasks.

 

trevorpipes

Photo: Composite cylinders are gaining popularity as a lightweight, high-strength option for modern hydraulic systems.

The importance of contamination control - September 2016

This article has been edited from content published in the book by Peter Chapple titled ‘Principles of Hydraulic Systems Design – second edition’, published by Momentum Press.

Components

The selection of inadequate filters or poor maintenance procedures can cause excessive contamination levels that may result in the unreliable operation and breakdown of hydraulic components. Filtration systems should, therefore, be designed such that the fluid cleanliness level is better than that specified by the component manufacturers.
The loaded contact regions are typically where metal particles generated in pumps and also where particles in the incoming fluid will accelerate the wear process. The clearances in pumps, motors and valves are of the order of a few microns, and it is, therefore, essential that the particles in the fluid are maintained at a size that is appropriate for the prevention of wear in the clearances. Filters in a system clearly have to have a rating that protects the smallest clearance in the system.

Filters

As the fluid passes radially inward through the element of a high-pressure filter, contaminant is trapped in the material. With time, the pressure drop across the filter will increase at a rate that is dependent on the fluid condition and, eventually, this will cause the bypass valve to open, thus passing contaminated fluid directly into the system. However, the pressure drop can be monitored either mechanically or by electronic methods to give an early warning of bypassing, and this aspect is an important feature in a properly maintained system.

A major problem associated with filtration is that its effect cannot be seen because of the small size of particles that can cause poor system reliability and component failure. So, it is important that monitoring of the filter condition is carried out on a regular basis. Sampling techniques and the measurement of the contaminant concentration provide an improved basis for monitoring the condition of the hydraulic system. Of these, online monitoring is the most cost-effective method of achieving this.

The performance of a filter is based on its ability to trap particles, which is defined by its beta ratio, β, that is obtained from an internationally accepted laboratory-based test method.

The filtration media of most modern hydraulic filters consist of fibrous material, usually filaments of glass, and this gives the filter a different performance with size, which shows the performance of different grades of media when tested using the Multi-pass test. The rating of a filter is obtained from this data and is the micron size (x) where a stated β value is attained, usually β x = 200 or β x = 1,000. Note that calling the rating ‘absolute’ for these filters has been discredited due to the statistical nature of particle removal.

The performance of the filter has an immediate effect on the cleanliness level of the fluid downstream of the filter, and the higher the beta ratio the cleaner the fluid.

Filters are selected on the basis of achieving the desired contamination levels and having sufficient contaminant holding capacity to maintain the required contamination levels under the worst envisaged circumstances. Various selection methods are available from different filter manufacturers, but for consistency, the process developed by the British Fluid Power Association (BFPA) has been developed into two ISO Standards1,2 (see References). Their use is recommended, the majority of which are based on an absolute filter rating at a given β ratio.

In general terms, the downstream fluid quality varies as the reciprocal of the filter beta ratio.
Contaminant levels are denoted by an ISO code that is related to the number of particles of sizes greater than 4, 6, and 14 microns, respectively; if the analysis method is using an automatic particle counter, but if it is by microscope, the ISO 4406 Code is at -/5/15 microns.

References

1. ISO TS 12669 Hydraulic fluid power – Guidelines for determining the required cleanliness level (RCL) of a system, (in draft).
2. ISO TR 15640 Hydraulic fluid power – Contamination control – General principles and guidelines for selection and application of hydraulic filters.

Demonstration of Digital Displacement® hydraulics for off highway applications - September 2016

Based on its award winning Digital Displacement® technology, Artemis Intelligent Power has started the process of installing Digital Displacement® pumps in a 16T excavator.

Today’s excavators have reached a mature level of technology using variable-stroke hydraulic pumps. They are rugged, dependable machines which operate in tough conditions. However, at the heart of all modern excavators lie a number of problems: the mechanical pumps have substantial energy losses, the valve systems waste fluid energy by throttling flow to control multiple axes and energy which could be recovered is instead converted into heat.

With a peak efficiency of 93 – 97% across a wide range of operating points, Digital Displacement® Technology is a revolution in efficiency and control of variable displacement hydraulic machines.

Key to the hydraulic excavator’s success is fine control and the ability to convert maximum power from the engine into multiple linear motions. Before and after comparisons based on standard trenching and loading cycles are to be evaluated to provide data on energy savings and controllability.

Artemis, a member of the British Fluid Power Association will use the mule excavator to demonstrate the fuel economy and productivity benefits of Digital Displacement® technology to major industry OEMs in the off-highway sector.

For more information about Artemis Intelligent Power please visit their website www.artemisip.com
For enquiries concerning this article, please contact: Alasdair Robertson a.robertson@artemisip.com or telephone 0131 440 6273

The pneumatic-electrical dynamic in motion control - September 2016

The benefits of automated motion control are becoming increasingly well-recognised, with both electrical and mechanical developments having made major technological strides over the past few years.

Chris Walsh, UK sales manager, Asco Numatics, reflects that in the past, pneumatic equipment was often less compatible with a control system. This often resulted in the mechanical engineers of yesteryear having separate pneumatic systems – sometimes with banks of solenoids – communicating with the electrical system. “Historically the fluid power components were designed into a machine for its movements on one page and the intelligent control was kept separate,” he explained. “The two technologies were effectively brought together by using an electro-pneumatic interface – for example solenoid valves and PLC in a control cabinet. Today, pneumatics and electrical devices are commonly conceived together as part of a fully generic machine design; control of both is considered as one. Pneumatic actuators are now often controlled by intelligent solenoid valves which are typically part of a fieldbus system; sometimes with proportional control, with feedback diagnostics networking within a multifaceted factory control platform and able to send wireless data through the extranet.”

Achieving the required result

Richard Edwards, technical director, IMI Precision Engineering, considers that the technology behind most engineering solutions has to involve some level of compromise with regard to fluid power and electrical application. “Typically it’s about deciding on the best choice of technologies to achieve the required end result,” he said, adding that there are well-recognised advantages and disadvantages in both electric and pneumatic actuation. “For example, the advantages of electric actuation include the fact that you don’t need a compressed air supply, which, if you don’t already have one will need sourcing and installing. The ongoing operating cost of an electric actuator may prove to be less than a pneumatic alternative, but the acquisition cost is typically more expensive. An electric actuator will generally provide a greater level of precision and will offer the flexibility to stop it part way along its stroke. The ability to profile the speed and the force applied throughout the stroke of the actuator can be vital for some applications. However, the changes taking place in the world of pneumatic actuation – such as linear transducers and proportional control – are impressive.”

With regard to specific equipment, Giorgio Guzzoni, product manager, Metal Work SpA, believes electric actuators are the right solution for motion control when it is necessary to position accurately at unspecified values, and control speed and/or acceleration ramps. He adds that both technologies – pneumatic actuators and electric actuators – have come together in what are commonly known as electric cylinders. These are electric actuators housed in structures that have the shape of a cylinder.
Guzzoni also makes the point that despite the increasing prevalence of electrical motion control, pneumatics continues to play a highly significant role. “It wouldn’t be incorrect to say that 95 per cent of cases with movement requirements can be solved with the conventional, reliable, cost-effective and simple pneumatic cylinder,” he said. “The position reached can be checked by a similarly conventional magnetic sensor. Anybody who produces pneumatic components can sleep soundly in bed at night.”

Something that has seen some of the most rigorous development in recent times is the modern industrial robot. Edwards considers one of the advantages of a robot over a special-purpose piece of equipment is its inherent flexibility and its ability to be reprogrammed to undertake a range of different tasks. This is where Edwards believes electronic and electrical actuation systems come to the fore. However, in areas such as end-of-arm tooling, he believes pneumatics can play a highly significant role; for example, a vacuum system to pick up items such as metal sheets or car body parts. “In this way, robotics can be a good example of a hybrid electrical-pneumatic application,” he said.

Maintenance, repair and replacement

From a maintenance, repair or replacement perspective, Edwards comments that when providing solutions into developing countries pneumatic solutions can have an advantage because they are easy to understand and can often be maintained with simple tools. “On the other hand, if something electrical breaks down you may need to fly in a service engineer a considerable distance in order to replace them,” he added.
In terms of lifecycle of a pneumatic actuator, Edwards points out that users will generally see a progressive deterioration in performance towards the end of its life. “It will start to get stiff and may start to leak,” he said. “However, through condition monitoring users can keep on top of this type of issue and, for example, allow the machine to finish a run before servicing it over the weekend. In the case of an electric actuator, it may operate effectively throughout its lifecycle, but if it fails, it may do so without warning and the machine will immediately cease to function until a replacement actuator is fitted. So, depending on the application this can be a consideration when choosing pneumatic or electric actuation.”

Keeping safe

From a safety perspective, Edwards points out that many mining applications are largely or completely pneumatic in order to reduce the risk of a spark inside a potentially explosive atmosphere. “This can be more convenient than trying to encase everything within an electric application,” he said.
With regard to regulatory requirements concerning safety, Edwards believes it can be an advantage to have both pneumatics and electric control options in place in order to eliminate the potential for a single failure mode. “In this way, companies that deploy an electric solution with a pneumatic backup or vice versa, can rest easier if they lose their power supply,” he said.

Industry 4.0

The motion control industry is increasingly looking at the potential of connectivity concepts such as the Internet of Things (IoT) and Industry 4.0. In this regard, Walsh makes the point that fluid power product portfolios are now becoming more and more aligned with high-end control system functionality. “Cross-protocol communications is becoming a must and rapid data-exchange of all components is expected with Industry 4.0,” he said.
In terms of maintenance, Edwards comments that as engineers become more aware of the potential for connected communication between devices and more conscious of the benefits that could potentially be gained through, for example, a better preventative maintenance or condition monitoring regime, he believes Industry 4.0 will increasingly become the norm.

Pushing the innovation envelope

In terms of other recent innovations within the motion control arena, Walsh explains that there have been a number of enhancements regarding fieldbus technology in pneumatics, positioning feedback in pneumatics actuators (for example, electronic linear transducers within the cylinder) and inbuilt diagnostics in pneumatic valve manifolds (for example, measuring valve speed to predict seal failure). Walsh has also seen the introduction of products that provide ease of set-up and commissioning for systems engineers; one example being self-addressing fieldbus systems. Additionally, Walsh points to components designed to be easily added-to or changed. “All these developments can provide easier and faster operation, lower labour requirements, and require easier maintenance resulting in less downtime,” he said.

Edwards commented that although a large slice of IMI Precision Engineering’s business involves industrial automation, there is a growing range of applications that don’t lend themselves to simple categorisation. “For example, I recently visited a customer that is producing a system that can fire projectiles and a net in order to capture drones for the purpose of airport security,” he explained. “The company uses a pneumatic cannon to launch the projectile to catch the drones.”Edwards added that electric actuation is also advancing. “As technology changes the costs are coming down and the power density that they can achieve is going up,” he said.

The right solution

Edwards’ view is that pneumatics and electrics shouldn’t be viewed primarily as two technologies in competition with each other. “It really boils down to what is deemed to be the best solution for the end-user’s specific application,” he said. “If you try to sell the wrong technology you may win the business but you’re going to cause yourself and your customer problems further down the road.”
Similarly, Guzzoni stressed that it doesn’t pay to use a sledge hammer to crack a nut – the important thing is to engage the support of technicians that have the right level of knowledge and experience to help companies make the best choices when sourcing motion control solutions.

For further information about BFPA or anything contained in this article, please contact BFPA on 01608 647900 or Email enquiries@bfpa.co.uk

The importance of security in an increasingly connected world - March 2016

In recent times hydraulic and pneumatic systems have become much more sophisticated, comprising a selection of components that enable system design dreams to be turned into a reality.

Traditionally, fluid power systems have concentrated on power transmission; with hydraulic systems mainly made up of control valves, power unit, hydraulic actuators and fluid monitoring equipment, and pneumatics systems comprising a power unit, fluid conditioning, actuators and control valves. Today, fluid power systems are not just about power transmission, but more about motion control, with a focus on moving things in a more precise and predictable fashion. This can involve electro-hydraulic or electro-pneumatic actuation, which in turn is part of a network by which many of the individual components within the system are able to communicate with each other.

The communications process need not only be autonomous and operating within the particular system in question; indeed the system, or components within the system, can also communicate with a much wider network. Also, the plant controller or maintenance engineer no longer needs to be in such regular close proximity to the plant and equipment in order to control and monitor its operation. Through the use of sensors and wireless technology plant control and monitoring need not be so confined to within the walls of a physical building and could feasibly be undertaken from anywhere in the world.

So, with all this increased motion control and communications know-how many modern fluid power systems have grown to become part of a much wider network. This wider network scenario is, in essence, very much part of the Industry 4.0 revolution whereby communication reaches wider and accessibility of information to and from these systems becomes much easier.

The overriding benefits of having easy access of information, often in real-time or near real-time, are many. For example, sensors within a system can automatically inform a maintenance engineer when a component or larger piece of equipment has malfunctioned or is due for replacement by sending an alert to his or her smartphone or tablet PC. The maintenance engineer can also remotely interrogate particular equipment within the system in order to, for example, change its function, hours of operation, schedule maintenance procedures, or investigate its operational history and which personnel operated certain types of equipment during specific periods.

However, with all these benefits and more to be had from today’s integrated high-tech motion control systems – whether from an operational or maintenance and overhaul perspective – certain important choices and decisions need to be made, and some of the most important of these revolve around security. Before we start running we have got to learn to walk, and this basic statement of common sense can also be applied figuratively to modern motion control systems. Careful thought needs to be given about who should be allowed to access the system, or parts of the system, and be able to make decisions in terms of operating or maintaining or making changes to the system and the wider network.

Moreover, making this type of decision regarding individuals’ access to, and mandate to control, the system is just the start. Only certain people may have been given the authority to do certain things, or have access to certain types of information, but without careful control and monitoring of communication protocols, information kept within the system could be open to infiltration or malicious abuse by other parties.

In this regard, I believe the biggest concern is that if people were able to maliciously intercept these communication systems it may not be long before a serious injury or even a fatality results – it could be due to motion equipment in a bottling plant becoming unstable, it could be the result of robotic arms flailing in precarious ways, it could be due to a shock from a power transmission system, and so on. In the wake of a serious injury or death, the subsequent court case could then set a precedent whereby a whole new level of cyber policing is put in place – deemed necessary to bring the situation under control. If this high level of policing were to become a reality, this could potentially stop the growth in further development and deployment of Industry 4.0-related systems technology in its tracks.

Therefore, understanding how robust a company’s data communication systems are is a very important consideration. Some systems are likely to be more resilient than others. For example, in a manufacturing plant a radio-frequency (RF) wireless transmission system could prove to be more reliable and robust than Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi is more open to being intercepted or corrupted at any level. So, although we all want change for the better there also comes a time to reflect on what the implications could be if we change too rapidly without thinking about the possible consequences.

It is also worth ensuring that any computer software used as part of the system has a reputation for being secure, and that proven encryption technology is deployed to make it as hard as possible for malicious hacking to take place. Additionally, companies should make sure that immediate IT-related help and advice is at hand in the event of such a security breach occurring. And from a system design perspective, I believe it is important that systems are thoroughly beta- tested ‘in the real world’ in order to monitor their performance and resistance to security abuses.

The world is becoming an increasingly unpredictable environment, and so the issue of security risk should not be taken lightly. It is therefore all the more important that we should develop efficient, reliable and robust motion control systems in order for them to conform to the best ideals of Industry 4.0 without risk of compromise. Industry 4.0 is already here and the trend is likely to gather even greater momentum over the coming months and years.

Thankfully these security issues are being addressed by information network providers and the like who have realised that the consumer internet and existing wireless platforms are not fully suitable for industry. In fact, such is the speed of change that I advise those interested to keep a watchful eye on new government guidelines and news from trade associations such as the British Fluid Power Association (BFPA). Let’s not let poor levels of security risk compromising the major improvements in efficiency, convenience and reliability that this type of technology can offer.

 

 

About the author

Mark Fairhurst is the Technical Director at BHR Group. He is presently the Vice-Chairman the product testing committee of the BFPA/BSI, and the Chairman of the Technical Advisory committee of the Water Jet Technology Conference.

About BHR Group

BHR Group is an independent industrial research and technology organisation specialising in the application of fluid engineering to industrial processes. Originally set up as the British Hydromechanics Research Association (BHRA) in 1947, BHR Group provides impartial expert advice, with a focus on fluid engineering technical services, products, processes and knowledge transfer. BHR Group is the trading name for VirtualPiE Ltd., a UK-based independent and privately owned company.

Efficiency by design - March 2016

By Mark Fairhurst, Technical Director, BHR Group

As technology advances it is critical that the design, manufacture and testing of parts and components is undertaken in an increasingly meticulous manner. For example, in such high-cost and mission-critical sectors as aerospace and automotive it is important that the equipment functions efficiently during long cycles of operation – often under extremely high pressures. It is therefore imperative that this equipment offers the highest levels of reliability and efficiency. After all, if a part or component fails in an aircraft or vehicle there is a chain of potentially serious repercussions to consider; not least of which being the safety of people on-board.

The importance of quality, efficiency and accuracy may seem obvious; however as someone who has worked in the product testing industry for many years I still see what are in essence very fundamental mistakes being made, which have potentially serious, even hazardous, consequences further down the line. These mistakes often occur in the early stages of development – during product design.

Paying attention to the fine detail at this stage is vital; because the prototyping, manufacturing and testing procedures that follow can be seriously jeopardised if an error is made ‘on the drawing board’. This can be a particularly serious issue when equipment designed to work under high pressures is involved and has to go through a series of cyclic fatigue tests before the equipment can be supplied to the customer.

Designers may be very able in terms of preparing a highly detailed design of a product or component as 3-D model in a computer design package – factoring-in the right materials and coatings to provide the appropriate stress rates and other material properties such as dimensions and weight. However, what needs to be constantly borne in mind is that every detail drawn in those designs will need to be carried through to manufacture. It only requires the slightest error or oversight related to a small part or component for serious problems to occur further down the line.

For example, a thread may not have been fully finished off or placed precisely in the right position; an O-ring may have been placed without careful thought to where the groove is positioned in relation to the rest of the thickness of the material. And it only requires a bolt to be put in the wrong place on the flange or for a radius to be not quite right. When these errors occur serious performance or lifecycle issues can arise.

Of course, design isn’t the only area of product development that can be at fault. The performance of equipment will also rely very heavily on the quality and suitability of the material that is used to make it. The required performance or resilience levels cannot always be guaranteed, which, again, could introduce safety or operational concerns. These concerns may mean that secondary finishing operations are required to enhance the surface strength of the material that is used for the manufacture of the outer casing of the equipment – processes such as laser peening or anodising to increase the thickness of the oxide layer on the metallic surface.

This material has to work and has to be proven to work. However, if the manufacturer totally relies on these types of secondary finishing processes and the material doesn’t function to efficiency levels required, then the customer is going to be let down in terms of service. This is when efficiency and safety factors can appear. Therefore, it is always advisable that materials and coatings used in such high-cost and high-performance sectors as aerospace and automotive are subjected to thorough cyclic fatigue tests.

Another thing to bear in mind is when product and material tests are carried out dangerous assumptions can sometimes be made. For example, it might be assumed that a standard type of, say, aerospace or automotive oil could be used for certain types of equipment. However, there only needs to be a slight change in chemical composition before the equipment could not only experience a cyclic fatigue attack affect but could also seriously affect the efficiency and lifecycle of the product.

The good news is that there are proven test houses that specialise in providing these types of services. Also, the British Fluid Power Association (BFPA) and British Standards Institution (BSI) among other established industry bodies are keen champions of best practice with regard to the fatigue testing of pressure-containing envelopes etc. Further guidance for designers, manufacturers and product testers is also available in the form of the standard ISO 10771, which specifies a method of fatigue testing the pressure-containing envelopes of components made from metals, which are used in hydraulic fluid power systems under sustained steady cyclic internal pressure loads. Additional requirements or more specific methods that can be required for particular components are contained in other standards.

We all live in an increasingly virtual world, where computerisation is playing an ever greater role within design and manufacturing disciplines. We only have to consider cutting-edge concepts such as Industry 4.0, the Internet of Things and the Smart Factory to realise this is the way forward. However the end result of product design and material specification is still a physical product that has to meet the exacting requirements of its intended use. This is a quality issue that has to be taken very seriously.

We will always continue to push back the technological frontiers, but alongside this pace of change design and manufacturing procedures, as well as industry standards, have to be revised when necessary in order to accurately reflect the changes in products and how they are used under increasingly challenging conditions – for example, products that encounter ever larger levels of cyclic fatigue. Also, new product tests need to be established that are more representative of what is on the market today, and with an eye to what is likely to be launched to market in the future. In this regard, companies such as BHR Group, and industry bodies such as the BFPA and the BSI, must continue to bang the drum of high standards regarding design, manufacture and testing quality and integrity.

The devil really is in the detail of converting designs successfully into the manufactured product, and cutting corners is never an option even though, as commercial concerns, companies may be driven by margins and profit goals. However, with a thorough and accurate design and materials testing regime in place, equipment can be made fit for purpose; functioning efficiently and safely over many years of use.

About the author

Mark Fairhurst is the Technical Director at BHR Group. He is presently the Vice-Chairman the product testing committee of the BFPA/BSI, and the Chairman of the Technical Advisory committee of the Water Jet Technology Conference.

About BHR Group

BHR Group is an independent industrial research and technology organisation specialising in the application of fluid engineering to industrial processes. Originally set up as the British Hydromechanics Research Association (BHRA) in 1947, BHR Group provides impartial expert advice, with a focus on fluid engineering technical services, products, processes and knowledge transfer. BHR Group is the trading name for VirtualPiE Ltd., a UK-based independent and privately owned company.